Facebook and Pinterest: The Social Enforcers

No more hiding behind the admin panel in the view only mode.  Facebook has rolled out Timeline for all brands, ready or not.  We’ve watched the early adopters of Timeline get their feet wet first.  We’ve also watched the recent explosion of the newest social site, Pinterest.  Their early adopters have taken charge while others jump on the bandwagon in record high numbers.  Now that these two powerhouses have rolled out new platforms or came on the scene with a fury, some dust has settled.  This dust is turning into gold for some brands.

While Facebook’s proves that “brands get 46% more engagement per post with Timeline,”[1] Pinterest surpasses Google, Bing and Twitter as a leading source of traffic to blogs.[2] It seems those brands who are successful with these platforms understand that social is to be social.  Social media marketing is not an advertising or sales avenue.  It is a story-telling avenue in which a brand is to engage with and connect to its audience in a personal way.

Facebook’s Reason for Timeline

Facebook was getting out of control with the advertising mayhem.  Landing pages and paid ads were everywhere, which completely Facebook Timelinegoes against what Facebook was originally meant for.  (Did you guys not see the movie?!?)  And Pinterest was simply set up to share pins of favorite media, not blast other users with advertising, sales and affiliate marketing.  So Facebook and Pinterest have had to become enforcers of their own social sites as well as enforcers for the true meaning and purpose of social media.

The whole purpose for Facebook’s Timeline is to remove the opportunity for hard sales and in your face advertising.  Just look at how the new platform does not allow for any advertising lingo in its new cover photo area. It has also pushed the infamous gated tabs used as landing pages for new community members to one of the app areas below the cover pic, putting any call-to-action from a brand in a soft, subtle light instead of the main focus of the channel.

Pinterest’s Reason for a Change in Terms of Service

Pinterest TOSAt the same time, Pinterest took action by making some very noteworthy changes to its Terms of Service and taking measures to ensure attention be brought to the copyright, privacy and appropriate use sections that have now been updated.[3] It seems there has been a huge problem with affiliate marketers infiltrating the site with affiliate links as well as inappropriate pins being allowed.  Pinterest is working hard to shut all of this down.

Both Facebook and Pinterest are working diligently to get their social sites back to being social instead of marketing meat lockers.  Facebook does still allow for promotions to be shared, new products to be announced, etc., just not through a landing page.  All users land on Timeline.  All users will then have a choice of clicking on an app that has a call-to-action or an offering – or not.  Pinterest, on the same hand, does allow for brands to self-promote (where they did not before) but simply require that brands “be authentic.” They do not allow for brands to have their Pinterest profiles come across as advertisements.

What have you done or plan to do to adhere to these changes?  Do you understand why these changes took place and agree they were much needed?  Do you see the success in these changes?  Share your thoughts with us!




[1] Simply Measured

[2] Mashable

[3] Splash Media Blog

No more hiding behind the admin panel in the view only mode.  Facebook has rolled out Timeline for all brands, ready or not.  We’ve watched the early adopters of Timeline get their feet wet first.  We’ve also watched the recent explosion of the newest social site, Pinterest.  Their early adopters have taken charge while others jump on the bandwagon in record high numbers.  Now that these two powerhouses have rolled out new platforms or came on the scene with a fury, some dust has settled.  This dust is turning into gold for some brands.

While Facebook’s proves that “brands get 46% more engagement per post with Timeline,”[1] Pinterest surpasses Google, Bing and Twitter as a leading source of traffic to blogs.[2] It seems those brands who are successful with these platforms understand that social is to be social.  Social media marketing is not an advertising or sales avenue.  It is a story-telling avenue in which a brand is to engage with and connect to its audience in a personal way.

Facebook’s Reason for Timeline

Facebook was getting out of control with the advertising mayhem.  Landing pages and paid ads were everywhere, which completely goes against what Facebook was originally meant for.  (Did you guys not see the movie?!?)  And Pinterest was simply set up to share pins of favorite media, not blast other users with advertising, sales and affiliate marketing.  So Facebook and Pinterest have had to become enforcers of their own social sites as well as enforcers for the true meaning and purpose of social media.

The whole purpose for Facebook’s Timeline is to remove the opportunity for hard sales and in your face advertising.  Just look at how the new platform does not allow for any advertising lingo in its new cover photo area. It has also pushed the infamous gated tabs used as landing pages for new community members to one of the app areas below the cover pic, putting any call-to-action from a brand in a soft, subtle light instead of the main focus of the channel.

Pinterest’s Reason for a Change in Terms of Service

At the same time, Pinterest took action by making some very noteworthy changes to its Terms of Service and taking measures to ensure attention be brought to the copyright, privacy and appropriate use sections that have now been updated.[3] It seems there has been a huge problem with affiliate marketers infiltrating the site with affiliate links as well as inappropriate pins being allowed.  Pinterest is working hard to shut all of this down.

Both Facebook and Pinterest are working diligently to get their social sites back to being social instead of marketing meat lockers.  Facebook does still allow for promotions to be shared, new products to be announced, etc., just not through a landing page.  All users land on Timeline.  All users will then have a choice of clicking on an app that has a call-to-action or an offering – or not.  Pinterest, on the same hand, does allow for brands to self-promote (where they did not before) but simply require that brands “be authentic.” They do not allow for brands to have their Pinterest profiles come across as advertisements.

What have you done or plan to do to adhere to these changes?  Do you understand why these changes took place and agree they were much needed?  Do you see the success in these changes?  Share your thoughts with us!




[1] Simply Measured

[2] Mashable

[3] Splash Media Blog